Newsletter

Volume 19 Issue 1  April  2016

(Page 4 of 6)

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 The Birth of Waldstadt …...Cont

My mind now turned to operation and in particular the often vexing subject of uncoupling! An article in an old edition of BRM sprang to mind. This very simple system comprises of a hole drilled between the sleepers at the point where uncoupling is required into which a nail is placed, you then take half a cork and push it onto the end of the nail. You then simply reach under the board and push up on the cork, by adjusting how far the nail is pushed into the cork you can alter the height of the coupling lift. Unfortunately it did not turn out that simple, as with traditional UK stock not only did the coupling lift but also the axle (the original article used container wagons so may not have suffered this problem) so back to the drawing board. The answer came in the form of some German stock that I had gathering dust at that time. I had seen an electric system in use on the large continental modular layout at TINGS and thought “if it works for their couplers it should work for mine”. A quick trial and hey presto! Success!

 

So, I now had a German layout on my hands and needed to rethink the scenics. Forests always come to mind with Germany and a stand of trees would hide the exit from the layout nicely. So, I now had a German layout on my hands and needed to rethink the scenics. Forests always come to mind with Germany and a stand of trees would hide the exit from the layout nicely.

Forests always come to mind with Germany and a stand of trees would hide the exit from the layout nicely. These were made by taking some of the smaller dead heads from a Buddleia bush, drying them and then spraying with glue and sprinkling with a dark green scatter. This produces a reasonable fir/conifer type tree at virtually no cost. A few twigs were cut and piled up in various places to give log piles and the area looked quite good.

 

On to the goods shed. I couldn't find anything suitable in kit form, so it was going to be scratch build. The base for the shed was made from toffee apple sticks cut to size, painted a dark brown and glued to form a rectangular base of suitable size and height. The walls of the shed were cut out of 2mm thick card and painted white inside and out with a widow made from a piece of scrap clear plastic with glazing bars carefully painted on as thin white lines. Thin strips of card were then cut, painted brown and glued to the corners, door frames and some diagonals to give a Bavarian effect to the building. Finally doors were added with some lightly scribed plasticard.

The yard was surfaced by painting with 50/50 PVA and sprinkling with chinchilla sand, which once dry was painted with various shades of diluted brown acrylic paints. I had some Peco sleeper built buffer stops which look quite effective when painted with sleeper grime and with a mix of ballast and a small amount of green scatter for

weeds sprinkled over the top. A coating of scatter in a mix of greens and yellows plus some bushes dotted around and that area seemed ok to me.

 

That left one corner at the front of the layout to fill. At a show the wife took a liking to a chalet style housekit and announced “I'll build it for you”. So, the house was duly built and placed in the empty corner with a hedge of green scourer covered with scatter to separate it from the forest. A road leading up to the house and goods yard was cut from fine wet & dry paper, glued in place and scatter used to blend in the edges.

 

 

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